Supreme Court protects cell phone privacy rights

The United States Supreme Court just issued a landmark decision in criminal law. The case is Riley v. California.

Essentially, the Supreme Court held that once you are in police custody, the police cannot search your cell phone without a warrant. Why is this important?

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Alex FreeburgSupreme Court protects cell phone privacy rights

Marijuana in Yellowstone or Grand Teton National Parks

Nationwide the attitudes on marijuana use are changing rapidly. Colorado, Washington, Oregon and Washington D.C. have legalized its recreational use. The Pew Research Center found that more than half of the country supports legalizing marijuana. Yet on federal land, as throughout Wyoming and Idaho, marijuana possession remains illegal.

What happens when a person is caught with marijuana in Yellowstone or Grand Teton National Parks?

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Alex FreeburgMarijuana in Yellowstone or Grand Teton National Parks

What should you do about a public intoxication charge?

Let’s get something out of the way: this is not the crime of the century. You were drunk (allegedly), things got a little rowdy (probably), and now you have a criminal charge (definitely).

What are the consequences to you?

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Alex FreeburgWhat should you do about a public intoxication charge?

What should you say to the police?

Now that I’m a defense attorney, I get to tell people what I thought all along when I was a prosecutor: don’t talk to the police. Just. Don’t. Talk.

If you’re pulled over, minimize the interaction. Ask if you’re free to leave. If you are free to go, then leave.

Well, it turns out that cops give that exact same advice.

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Alex FreeburgWhat should you say to the police?

What are the consequences for a DUI in a National Park?

Background – Law enforcement in Yellowstone and Grand Teton

Wyoming is blessed with two great national parks: Yellowstone and Grand Teton. Yellowstone claims over 3 million visits a year, while Grand Teton records more than 2.5 million visits. Many visitors camp at one of the park campgrounds or stay at a lodge. It is inevitable that visitors will celebrate, DUIs will occur, and that law enforcement will be there.

Because both parks are federal land, they are patrolled by federal law enforcement. Typically, law enforcement is a national park ranger, although there are also special agents who handle serious felony investigations.

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Alex FreeburgWhat are the consequences for a DUI in a National Park?