Let’s get something out of the way: this is not the crime of the century. You were drunk (allegedly), things got a little rowdy (probably), and now you have a criminal charge (definitely).

What are the consequences to you?

Generally, the consequences for a public intoxication charge in this part of Wyoming are a fine and maybe a little community service. Now if you’re a minor, or on probation for a DUI, things get a little more complicated, and like I love to say: consult a lawyer.

But for a lot of people, the consequence the prosecutor offered at your first hearing isn’t all that bad. It’s just money. Now, you may be thinking, “Wait a second, I was handcuffed, put in jail overnight, and now all the State wants punish me with is a fine? Why the handcuffs and jail? … All that I’ll say is that you have a point.

If that’s the situation you’re in, the main consequence of a public intoxication conviction is to your reputation. A public intoxication charge is a misdemeanor. A crime. So going forward, whether it’s on a financial aid application, a grad school application, a rental application, a home loan application, a job application, a job interview, or a blind date, the truthful answer you need to give is “Yes, I was convicted of a crime.” For some jobs, apartments and potential girlfriends, that’s not a big deal. For others it is.

In our modern world, when your data or profile is run through the corporate computer, it’s better not to have a criminal record. Don’t give them a reason to reject you and move on to the next person in line. One lush night shouldn’t change your trajectory.

Call an attorney. Figure out your options. Get a professional to handle it. Your reputation is worth it.